Tag Archives: tourism

When You’re on the Road to Nowhere, Get Off

Then you’ll be somewhere.

Most visitors to Iceland land at Keflavik Airport, just north of this beautiful landscape, and then race northwest to Reykjavik, missing out on the opportunity to hear the land speak.


The Icelanders have arranged it this way. Have you ever wondered why?

Reykjanes is calling!

Iceland Travel Tip #2: Instead of Reykjavik 101

The  101 district of Reykjavik is famous for being trendy. It is, admittedly, a great place to stare at the architecture that replaces a view, in generic spaces full of cars, dumpsters and starlings, all most familiar and comforting…

…but  you could go to Frambuðír and have a view deep into the Atlantic and Iceland’s heart.

Easy to get to. Just fight your way out of the city, north on Highway 1, turn left at Borgarnes, and before dinner time, with the Snaefell glacier looming over you, turn left to the little church at Buðir. Park, and walk west on the path closest to the sea. Within an hour, you will be staring out of this old farmhouse.  Because you won’t want to leave, there is, conveniently, a hotel right beside the church. You can shelter there.

When you come back to Reykjavik, if you come back, you might see it more directly.

Just saying.

Icelandic Travel Trip 1: Instead of Gulfoss

Well, you can go to Gullfoss …

…with the crowds.

Or you can go to Gilsáfoss. It’s not so large, but it has spirit, and an ice troll, if you go in April.

Gilsáfoss

Easy to get to, too. Drive east from the airport for 8 hours, turn left at Egilstadir, follow the lake through Hallomrstadir, and then, 30 minutes later, if you don’t stop to let the reindeer pass along the way, which is a fine reason to stop, for sure …

 

 

 

You’ll find it at the end of the lake, just upstream from the old bridge in the middle of this image. It’s the last stream before you cross the lake to the north side.  Have a nice trip! The ice troll is waiting. Gulfoss will thank you.

The Real Blue Lagoon: Catching Some Rays in North Iceland

The Blue Lagoon. A great place to dip into the waste water of a geothermal station.

You can lie on the beach and soak up the good vibes, too.

Very popular. There’s only room for a few.

And fish is served in the restaurant. Very pricey. On a cafeteria tray. And aren’t those IKEA dishes?

May I suggest a little drive to the North? Sigriðarstaðarós beckons, with a fine view north past the beached troll seals at the feet of Hvitserkur …

… to Skeljanes.

This is the real Blue Lagoon, right where the salmon swim out of the Húnafjörður into the Sigriðarstaðavatn, a lake by name but more like a fine estuarine lagoon full of young salmon going to sea and big ones flicking back. Make sure you keep your feet out of the water. Lift, good people, lift!

Munch some salmon, soak a little in the sun…

…or  a  lot.

… it’s a good life. And for a power station, the ogre herself.

Friends, think blue.

Out of Bounds

This photographer on Dyrhólaey is out of bounds. She crossed a barrier to get here. Thousands do.

Some die. Is this view not good enough?

Is this one not good enough?

What about this? So bad you need to die to get a different one?

We’d rather you were alive, really. Really. Besides, if you just turn around, you can see almost forever.

Then we could all go back and grill a lamb or something, drink some lava beer and have a great good time.

Well, ok, maybe not that.

Easy Identification of Elf City Sites

Elf farms and villages are craggy things to spot, but major cities hover inside the light. You can reach through the sun and… almost grasp them.

Pétursey

Evening is the best time for the sea to mix the Sun and the Earth and turn everything to salt dust in the air. Prepare for tears… of joy? of anguish? Ah, the elves are telling no secrets.