Tag Archives: East Iceland

Of Elves and Men in the East Fjords

Njardvik

Nowhere but in Borgarfjördur Eystri have I found mountains that so clearly express beings from another dimension of understanding. It’s no wonder that the great Icelandic painter Kjarval got started here.

The show changes daily, too:

All around. At distance…

… or up close:

Every step is through two worlds at once, and it’s your moving that makes the images move. Here, for instance, is the elf from the first image, three hours later, from a different angle. She’s like a very slow wind taking our measure.

Pathfinding in Iceland

If you’re going to follow the trail …

Threading through the mountain bogs on the way south from Stapavik

… the sheep won’t help you.

Yes, this poor ewe is lost.

It’s best to follow the stakes set out by the Icelandic government, to keep things safe. You’ll have to stomp around quite a bit to find them.

They’re not always even on the trail!

It’s always a happy moment to spot one.

Even if you’re at the bottom of the trail at that point! It’s just a little game Iceland plays with you. You might as well play along.

Filming Dragons in East Iceland

Some books only have one page. Here’s a midsummer one above Njardvik. Day by day it reveals itself, like a film.

Look at how the dragon from the south (left) is giving way to grass and cliffs, while the one from the right is holding strong, with three stories opening within its long ribcage. And check out the sad faces appearing in the slo-mo approach of the dragon from the south. Will it disappear before they do? Whew! Such suspense!

Oil Slick? Not in Iceland!

In Canada, this would be an oil slick, caused by a passing freighter illegally flushing out its tanks at sea.

Njardvik

Not so nice!

But in Iceland, it’s more like an Earth slick.

Njardvikura

It’s the confluence of a river that is taking an 1100-year-old farm away and the desire for a new road to prevent rural depopulation in Borgarfjördur Eystri.

The concept of “nature” is a balancing act here.

Arctic Terns Both Up and Down

Arctic terns.

They dive at your hair and scream. The screaming comes first. They’re just not much ones for settling down on land.

Even if it’s the Njardvik beach and the Njardvik troll.

Up in the air it is!

It’s ironic. One can get so intent on looking up to avoid them, that, um …

… one is in danger of stepping on them. True to form for a crew that doesn’t like land too much…

… they’re not much in the way of nests. Not really.

Really not.

So be careful where you walk, and if the terns start diving?

Don’t be there.

Puffin Guardians at Raudanes

The puffins at Rauðanes…

…are well-guarded. Note the troll, whose hair they live in, and his peek-a-boo stone seal.

Plus, a whole guard team on shore. Here’s one at work.

All this help allows puffins to build a pretty lovely set of penthouses in peace.

Just respect the management’s rules, that’s all, and yield at trail intersections!