Author Archives: Harold Rhenisch

About Harold Rhenisch

www.haroldrhenisch.com

Puffin Guardians at Raudanes

The puffins at Rauðanes…

…are well-guarded. Note the troll, whose hair they live in, and his peek-a-boo stone seal.

Plus, a whole guard team on shore. Here’s one at work.

All this help allows puffins to build a pretty lovely set of penthouses in peace.

Just respect the management’s rules, that’s all, and yield at trail intersections!

Three Rules of Promenading in Reykjavik

Always look in the back alley. In Iceland, its the contrast between glitz and reality that sells the place.

It makes humans feel right at home. At the same time, always check out the windows.

 

They aren’t for seeing into, as alleys are, but for giving you eyes in the back of your head, and multiple perspectives at once. And while you’re at it in Reykjavik, always pay attention to advertising posters. They are the user’s manual for the art installation.

Note how the sign is a smart phone screen, the guy on the right has the idea, as do the tourists behind the woman in red. Well done, everyone!

 

My Favourite Farm

Man, the thought of having a wall of basalt and a cinder cone in my backyard, I tell you, nothing could be better.
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If you don’t drive too quickly and get off Highway 1, you’ll find it. It’s a poor, poor farm, but, as Gunnar said, poverty is wealth, because everything the land gives comes straight from faith, as a gift, and gifts are not to be laughed away.

The Ogress’s Stair

Just west of Hengifoss, there is an ogress’s stairway, leading to the high country and off to Myvatnsveit.

She is not absent from it. Every ledge on the mountain has a name. Each is a separate sheep pasture. Talk about trusting ancient forces with one’s sheep (the “hidden people” just seems wrong, given how visible she is), or what.

The Troll of Njardvik

 

Amazingly, he has no story and no name. I think this is because he’s a pretty friendly guy overall, although during my week beneath him, I couldn’t help but wonder just how much his scree slope had moved onto farmland over the last 1100 years, and how many hundred metres the sea had eaten away the fields to the right.