Category Archives: Huldúfolk

The Cats of Akureyri

Right. Reykjavik has cats. Read all about the dears here:  A Cat Lover’s Guide to Reykjavik.    20,000 cats in the Capital Region. And 19,000 humans up North in Iceland’s other great city. A coincidence? I think not. I think the cats of Akureyri keep humans. They are super sneaky.  Do you see a cat in the image below?

No? That’s because she was just happy to let you know that she was out in the blizzard, and you, well, you weren’t, were you. Sorry, Capital Regioners. A victory for Akureyri here, by the looks of it.

Marking the Path on Snaefellsnes

If you follow a troll, you will find more trolls. You will also be on no set path.

If you follow a cairn, you will find more cairns. This is called pathfinding.

If you follow a human figure looking at a pile of trolls, you may or may not find a path, but you won’t be alone.

If you follow a cairn among trolls …

…  or  a troll cairn among lava bits…

… you are still not on a known path. Mind you, paths might be overrated. There are also walls. If you follow walls, you will find other walls.

But here’s the trick. Once you’ve wandered off like this, you have made a path. It’s what you find along the way that will guide you into getting back. As the sun goes down, you will be glad of these troll sheep guiding you home.

It matters not if they are ‘real’ or not. They are the path.

The Spirit of Water and Air

The beach at Hellissandur showed her spirit this morning.

As you can see, it doesn’t take a lot of light, or, better, the light goes inward rather than out. So is it with the long, low angles of the sun on Christmas Day. Look at the water erupt from the sand and say its name in this light.

It is a day on which the whole Earth is alive. We found that around this mountain at Midsummer.

And now, this force is just as strong. What welcome energy!

What life! This time, it’s not just the Earth that is alive. Look at the sun going down over Melariff at 2:30 in the afternoon!

The view is from the 1100-year old Viking Farm at Saxhóll. A few minutes later, the sky revealed a dragon.

And just after that, many stories all at once, enough to meditate on for a year.

As the sun left and rain fell across it in the West, the energy lingered, not in the sky but in my self that was the sky.

And so we carry ourselves, just as the Earth, the Water and the Sky carry us. It is we who are spirits of Earth, Water and Sky.

The Secret Origin of Icelandic Horses Revealed at Last

Icelandic horses are very beautiful, especially in a winter gale. Icelanders will tell you that their ancestors brought them over from Norway by ship. Sure, guys.

Let me take you behind the curtains of that little deception. It might look easy to be an Icelandic horse…

… but like being an Icelander …

… it can be a little rough. Really tough on the hair, for one.

Not only that, but tense, like.

Makes a horse a little crazed, you might think.

Watch out for your ears.

Yeah, but that is all because horses didn’t come over on boats from Norway and continue on to create America out of a lump of clay…


…just as Icelanders aren’t vikings but the descendants of Norwegian farmers and their Irish slaves, who came here for the good hotdogs.

As for the horses, they live near waterfalls. It’s a thing.

Svodufoss

Note the horses being born above. You can just make them out below, too.

The paddock is nearby, where humans can keep an eye on the miracle.

Hólmskelsárfoss

Miracle? Yes. Here’s a foal just about to be born in the stream coming down from the falls.
Hólmskelsá

That’s how it works in a magical country. That the resulting horses look like the horses you might meet elsewhere, well…

… that’s part of the magic, too.

Now you know.