Tag Archives: Beauty

The Wealth of Dwarves and Men in Iceland

Ah, volcanoes.

They make beautiful things.

Or beautiful things appear in the mind.

Barking Troll 

In a remote valley in Iceland, under a volcano, one can spend an afternoon among treasures.

I sure did.

The wealth of the dwarves, my ancestors called this stuff.

 

The wealth of men, too, I think.

And the wealth of the water..


And mystery enough.

And light within the stone..

This is old wisdom.

Totemic wisdom. Like this sheep amulet below.

This is the deeps of the mind and body, meeting in the light of the air.

This is what you get when you walk straight into the Earth. You’ll know where when you’re there.

Chance Sightings of the Sun

 

If you head East from Þingvellir and reach the height of land, and the turn off to Laugarvatn, why not stop and wait for the sun? This is elf country. They just might show. What you are looking for are rainbows almost invisible as the sun disperses the mist like a breath.

And if they don’t show, waiting is also arrival. It all depends upon which country you arrive in. Care to try? You’ve got nothing to lose!

Copse, Volcano and Troll, Head to Head

Birch copse, with path.

Shield volcano, with path.Skogarkot

Both are heads. Literally. The word remains in English as a cob, known in cobblestones (each has a round head) or a cape, which is also a headland, and that’s the Icelandic word: hæð, or head, or height. Remember that for the culture that settled this magical place, these really were heads. And so they remain.

Troll, Just Hatched, at Dimmu Borgir

At Dawn, Iceland is Four Worlds at Once

At first, dawn is pure light.

þingvellavatn

Then it reveals another world.

Then it turns blue. The other world is still there, but white now.

Then there are colours, and mountains, as the two worlds join.

When you count the houses built at þingvellir each time Iceland enacts a new constitution, that’s three worlds. Well, four if you count the ice.

Worlds Within Worlds

 

Light tells its own stories in Þingvellir. We are here to witness. It’s no surprise the Icelanders first called Christ “White Christ.” He was the north, that place from beyond the world. Who nonetheless came, physically, as this Earth, in a harsh and beautiful mercy.


Oxarárfoss