Tag Archives: Buðahraun

On Midsummer Night the Hills Come Alive on Snaefellsnes

It builds for days…

A dragon curled around its flame.

(Its right eye is just below the middle of the image. This image and the ones of transformed rocks and flowers that follow are taken on Rauðhóll.)

…with flowers bringing stones to life…

An Elf with a Crown of Flowers

… sometimes in humanly-recognizable form…

The Horse Sleipnir Carrying þor as a One-Eyed Moon on Its Back

… and sometimes not (which is the most amazing part) …

.. but then, in the low, late evening light on June 21, the hills rise up around you in the horizontal light. It’s just that night. The next morning they begin to ebb away, not all at once, but you can notice the difference. On midsummer night, though…

Buðahraun

… you truly live between worlds and can see the past and future. Lest you feel special, just remember, the sheep see this all the time.

Buðir

Life is indeed good.

Iceland Travel Tip #2: Instead of Reykjavik 101

The  101 district of Reykjavik is famous for being trendy. It is, admittedly, a great place to stare at the architecture that replaces a view, in generic spaces full of cars, dumpsters and starlings, all most familiar and comforting…

…but  you could go to Frambuðír and have a view deep into the Atlantic and Iceland’s heart.

Easy to get to. Just fight your way out of the city, north on Highway 1, turn left at Borgarnes, and before dinner time, with the Snaefell glacier looming over you, turn left to the little church at Buðir. Park, and walk west on the path closest to the sea. Within an hour, you will be staring out of this old farmhouse.  Because you won’t want to leave, there is, conveniently, a hotel right beside the church. You can shelter there.

When you come back to Reykjavik, if you come back, you might see it more directly.

Just saying.

Magical Buðahraun

Here’s the trail for me.
It leads to Buðaklettur, and then west into the November sun.But make no mistake, it passes through the mind along the way. Imagine, walking through your deepest thoughts. When I walked here last November, it took all my strength to put one foot in front of another. I found it nearly impossible to keep walking. I wouldn’t call it being lost, or being in danger of being lost. I wouldn’t even call it being found. It sure was good not to be alone. I’ve never made a journey like this, although this was only a small part of the journey that is to be made. What that journey is, I don’t know. Well, “I” doesn’t know, but the rest of me sure does. This is the path.This is a dangerous place. A place where the path travels where wakefulness and sleep take on different forms.If you step off the path, what then?

The question is nonsensical. To stay on the path is to step off of it. To step off of it is to lose it.

Go with someone you love. Go together. Hold on to each other. You are your line back home. I’m not from Iceland, but I know home when I see it.  The wind blows there. At 45 m/s. Well, sometimes. This time.
It is a place to lose yourself, and then, as a completely different person, to lead it back home. I can’t explain it. I am only drawn there, like a beast on a line.

On a narrow path. Of blood. 

Of mind.I can’t explain it. I don’t want to.

This is poetry when it has left all words behind.

This is the Buðahraun.