Tag Archives: 66 North

It’s Complicated

Icelanders dress quite practically. So do tourists. There’s one on the right, in Akureyri.

But 66 Degrees North knows that we all like brightness. It brings us in the door. Then we buy the dull stuff.  This is complicated marketing! For example, this is what I came for in December:

And a couple times, this is what I got:

I was drawn into 66 North by the bright lights, but bought nothing. It’s a mysterious thing. Is it because Akureyri is only 65.8 degrees north? As for Reykjavik?

Well, that’s a mere 64 degrees north. What more needs to be said.

 

Fashion Tips for Your Everyday Native of the Icelandic North

In a land of many stones at the top of the world, where it can, shh don’t tell anyone from the Icelandic Tourism Office, get cold…


… rocks contract from the flatness to stay warm.

Going flat is a sure way to lose all your heat, and it’s a long way to the merino wool shops at the mall in Reykjavik, and how are you going to walk there when you’re a rock? Nope, rounding up it is. Plants, being more evolved, follow suit, because they’re smart.

Now you know too.  Shh. Don’t tell anyone from the clothing shops of Reykjavik or they might open a branch up north. Here’s an ad for one geared for humans, that endearing lot. They started up north, then moved south where the humans are. A flag for everyone, to make everyone feel at home.

Here’s a version from half-ways to the north. This ewe has donated half her fleece to a stone, by the looks of it.

But what would a stone make of this?

This?

And what would a stone make of this?

This?

No, when you’re a rock, it’s better to clump up with your friends.

No, not like this:

Brrr!

Having Fun keeping Warm with the Fairies in the Icelandic (Oh Not Really) Cold

Six years back, these ads for warm weather clothing were all the rage.

A melancholy bunch, but they appealed to visitors of European heritage.

Who just want to go where it is cold and to be warm there, or at least are willing to let their bodies remember all that.

Of course, the ads were made in New York.

But their appeal was solid.

Today, the ads are still about superhuman melancholy, about prowess in conditions that would slay most others, but with adventure. No longer is being bodily present in Iceland enough. You have to be an airplane.

And of course, at the same time still be a vulnerable waif, even with a bit of fear and disdain.

Ah, Iceland, still playing with fairy lore after all these years.

Imagine if the Icelanders just got up one day and redefined the human myth instead! I’m waiting for that day.

Perhaps new glasses first?